Homeless in Indianapolis: Characteristics of the Sheltered and Long-Term Homeless

Date
2014-02-25
Language
American English
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M.A.
Degree Year
2013
Department
Department of Sociology
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Indiana University
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Abstract

Virtually every society can, at some point, be affected by homelessness. In recent years in the United States, homeless rates have hovered around three percent of the entire population. Although this marginalized population has been studied before, little is known regarding the possible characteristics that can keep an individual in homelessness or affect their living conditions while being homeless. This thesis provides an in-depth look at specific characteristics that could be factors in the length of the homeless experience, as well as how these same characteristics could impact the shelter status while an individual is homeless. The study reveals that homelessness in Indianapolis was mostly experienced by those who were male, African-American, and between the ages of 31-50. Furthermore, the majority were found to live in shelters and be homeless for twelve months or less.

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Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI)
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