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THREE INDIANA WOMEN'S CLUBS: A STUDY OF THEIR PATTERNS OF ASSOCIATION, STUDY PRACTICES, AND CIVIC IMPROVEMENT WORK, 1886-1910

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dc.contributor.advisor Barrows, Robert G. (Robert Graham), 1946-
dc.contributor.advisor Robertson, Nancy Marie, 1956- en
dc.contributor.advisor Wokeck, Marianne Sophia en
dc.contributor.author Owen, Mary Elizabeth
dc.date 2008 en
dc.date.accessioned 2008-07-08T15:22:14Z
dc.date.available 2008-07-08T15:22:14Z
dc.date.issued 2008-07-08T15:22:14Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1805/1636
dc.description Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) en
dc.description.abstract Springing up in the last quarter of the nineteenth century, Indiana women's study clubs provided generations of women with the opportunity to improve their educations in a friendly environment. They also brought culture to their communities by hosting art exhibits, musical entertainments, and lectures, building libraries and museums, and participating in community improvement endeavors. The activities of urban clubs in big cities have been documented in histories of the women's club movement, but small towns have recieved little attention even through they were vital parts of their communities. This study considers the characteristics, organization, study practices, and civic improvement work of three small-town Indiana women's clubs in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. The Zerelda Reading Club (Warsaw) studied a wide variety of subjects, while the Ladies' Piano Club (Salem) and Florentine Club (Lebanon) limited their studies to art and music, respectively. All three clubs participated in community improvement efforts that helped their towns achieve urban amenities. The Zerelda Reading Club helped to establish a ladies' rest room, the Ladies' Piano Club worked with other community organizations to build a Carnegie public library, and the Florentine Club raised money to beautify Oak Hill Cemetery. Forming in decades of tremendous growth in popularity of club activity, the organization of all three clubs shows influences of those associations already in existence. This study argues that the individual circumstances of members and their communities resulted in the organization of three women's clubs that prospered under the guidance of extant clubs, but served their members and their communities by adapting activities to suit local needs. en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.subject clubwomen en
dc.subject women's club en
dc.subject woman's club en
dc.subject civic improvement en
dc.subject study club en
dc.subject Zerelda Reading Club en
dc.subject Ladies' Piano Club en
dc.subject Florentine Club en
dc.subject Indiana women in the Gilded Age en
dc.subject Indiana women in the Progressive Era en
dc.subject.lcsh United States -- Social life and customs -- 1865-1918 en
dc.subject.lcsh Women -- Societies and clubs -- Indiana -- History -- 19th century en
dc.subject.lcsh Zerelda Reading Club (Warsaw, Ind.) en
dc.subject.lcsh Florentine Club (Lebanon, Ind.) en
dc.subject.lcsh Ladies' Piano Club (Salem, Ind.) en
dc.title THREE INDIANA WOMEN'S CLUBS: A STUDY OF THEIR PATTERNS OF ASSOCIATION, STUDY PRACTICES, AND CIVIC IMPROVEMENT WORK, 1886-1910 en
dc.type Thesis en
dc.degree.level M.A. en
dc.degree.discipline Department of History en
dc.degree.grantor Indiana University en


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